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10 Key Points to Help You Yield Respect as a Leader in Entertainment & Events Business

Jul 21 • Event Entertainment Supply, Event Management • 871 Views • No Comments on 10 Key Points to Help You Yield Respect as a Leader in Entertainment & Events Business

“Real Leaders Don’t Boss, but rather Inspire, motivate, and Earn respect from their employees as they watch their organization Soar”…

 

Entertainment and events’ business needs special inspiration and unique leadership traits that can definitely take the business to next level of success. An important element to consider is the mere respect because it tends that if you treat people right, you will get the results you want, and this is so true in business.

 

Great leaders; specially in entertainment and events business where team spirit should take hold to make every aspect goes well and with lots of sincere joy, understand particularly that respect isn’t an entitlement linked to a particular job title. They need to respect others before others will respect them.

 

So, how do you yield respect in your entertainment and events’ business? Here are 10 key points:

 

1. Lead by example. Embody the qualities and traits you expect from the people you lead and people you deal with. You want your team and peers to be honest, so be honest yourself in all your business dealings. If you want your employees to be hardworking, set that example. Model the traits you want others to show, such as integrity, kindness, creativity, inventiveness and industriousness.

 

2. Be humble. Don’t expect anyone to care about where you went to college or your past successes. Plenty of businesspeople went to top universities and graduated with honors, and plenty more win awards and honors from chambers of commerce all the time. Braggarts are boring and turn people off. Get over yourself and do it quickly. Avoid self-promotion and publicity stunts. They are obvious and obnoxious and can damage your reputation.

 

3. Show your commitment every single day. Work alongside the people you lead. Work longer and harder than they do. Get in the trenches and get your hands dirty once in a while. Talk to the employees, get to know their names so you can address them personally, ask them how things are going, and pitch in if needed. Ask them if there are any glitches that need correcting.

 

4. Help people succeed and advance. Promote your staff. Help your employees gain exposure and give them opportunities for development and advancement. Great leaders let their teams shine and are confident enough not to need the spotlight.

 

5. Be a teacher or mentor. People always have other work or educational opportunities regardless of the economy and will leave your business unless they see an investment is being made in their future. Focus on those people who are bright, hardworking, dedicated, reliable and creative, and have skill sets that you don’t, or those who show potential. Mentor them at work or support programs that allow them to earn a new skill certification or degree.

 

6. Strike a balance between delegating and being hands-on. An excessive delegator is opting out of responsibility, but keeping too tight control of everything deflates employees and tells them that you don’t value or trust their judgment. Find the middle ground.

 

7. Encourage creativity. Take chances to come up with new ideas. Teach people how to take calculated risks, and then let them test their wings. Don’t punish failure. Learn from mistakes. A leader has to create a setting where there is a full vetting of ideas, where everyone is expected to provide suggestions, and where nothing is necessarily wrong.
8. Share your expectations of others. People want to know what is expected of them so they can work to meet or exceed expectations. Help your employees succeed by letting them know what’s expected of them.

 

9. Reward success. It’s indeed a business of responsibility, thank those who do a good job with a reward or a recognition program to acknowledge employee successes on a regular basis. People want to be acknowledged for a job well done and will appreciate being called out for respect in front of their peers.

 

10. Build coalitions and maintain civility in all business dealings. The “divide and conquer” approach doesn’t work in the private sector and entertainment and events’ business. Nothing gets done! Civility and compromise are essential. Lots of people think that if you compromise, you’re weak. Nothing could be further from the truth. Leaders who compromise come across as caring leaders who are able to put others before themselves and who go out of their way to spend time understanding a differing point of view, even if they don’t act on it. Incivility impedes productivity – and profits.

Source: Conveyed with a reference from Ritch K. Eich, a former Chief of Public Affairs for Blue Shield of CA. The author of ‘How Ordinary People Become Extraordinary Leaders”

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